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No.1

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October 3rd 2015
2 - 5PM
240 Sterling Road, Toronto
Food by Katie Mathieu

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MOYRA DAVEY | SUZY LAKE | ELIZABETH MCINTOSH | SALLY SPÄTH | TIZIANA LA MELIA

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No. 1 launches a series of new limited edition prints produced by five exciting national and international artists. The works have each been produced exclusively for the occasion in an edition of twelve prints that will be available for sale individually and as a portfolio for a special price at the event. G Gallery’s programming is completely volunteer-driven. Funds raised will contribute to ongoing exhibition expenses including artist fees for upcoming projects.

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RSVP to editions@ggalleryprojects.ca

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EDITION PREVIEW

Moyra Davey
“Eyes”
Archival pigment ink on paper
27.5” X 35”
Edition of 12
2015

I took the prison photos (Ohio State Penitentiary, no longer there) around 1990 when Jason Simon was at the Wexner, Columbus, Ohio, I had a job teaching photo at OSU for a year. The eyes r my mother's, taken around 1984 for a show in Caracas. The present photo was made in one stage: all 6 photos stuck to larger one. I'm having a lot of fun these days repurposing the archive, this current move also relates to Genet in a few ways: if u read my essay "Caryatids & Promiscuity" I tell about Genet making an erotic montage on the back of the rules board in his cell, and me wanting to do something similar. Well, this piece "Eyes" grew out of that impulse. I know it's a bit if a stretch but in my mind there's a logic...

Can tell u more sometime, and the others in the series point more in that direction: all former flames (and current one when he was in his 20's)

the essay is from this, published for her show there:
http://www.camdenartscentre.org/shop/p/camden-publications/im-your-fan

Moyra Davey (born 1958) is a Canadian visual artist. Over the past three decades, Davey has built an extraordinary and increasingly influential body of work composed of photographs, writings, and video. As opposed to a current predilection for large-scale, digitally manipulated photographs, her seemingly modest works reclaim a practice of photography grown out of contingency and accident. Her camera often turns towards the unseen or the overlooked, as her subjects include dust, books, records, coins, empty whiskey bottles, coffee cups, gravestones, and people writing on the subway. Her practice presents a wide-ranging model of engagement with the world: a reflection on possibilities of producing and consuming, on writing and reading, on novelty and obsolescence, and on the future of images amidst an economy of profuse reproduction. She currently lives and works in New York City and is a faculty member at the Bard College International Center of Photography Program.

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Suzy Lake
“Performing an Archive: Beaubien 1910-1913”
Archival pigment ink on paper
image size: 16"x 24"; paper size: 20"x 28”
Edition of 12
2014

“Performing an Archive: Beaubien 1910 -1933,” is a photograph from a new book chronicling Lake’s family history positioned against the larger social and political forces shaping Detroit. This photograph, like many in this series, entangles a number of different temporal threads into a single image to provoke a sense of the history of urban development/redevelopment cycles that propel the movement of the city.

“In ‘Performing an Archive,’ Suzy Lake, an essential figure in Canadian contemporary Art with an international reputation, continues her exploration of questions around identity and social issues. Drawing on history and her own family history, Lake bears witness to the urban, demographic and social development of Detroit, a city marked throughout the twentieth century by economic decline, racial tension and a startling crime rate. In a performative process, she visits the scene of various locations where her ancestors lived.”

Back cover text from Suzy Lake: Performing an Archive. Black Dog Publishing, 2015

Suzy Lake was born in Detroit, Michigan in 1947. In 1968, she immigrated to Montreal, Quebec following the 1967 Detroit riots. Influenced by social and political involvement concurrent to the early conceptual period, she is known for her large-scale photography dealing the body as both subject and device.

Lake was one of a pioneering group of artists in the early 70’s artists the to adopt performance, video and photography in order to explore the politics of gender, the body and identity. Early examples of her work form part of two touring exhibitions titled WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution 1965 – 1980, first showing at the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art in March of 2007. In April of 2007, her work was featured in Identity Theft: Eleanor Antin, Lynn Hershman, Suzy Lake 1972-1978 at the Santa Monica Museum of Art.

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Elizabeth McIntosh
“My Curves are Not Crazy”
Silkscreen on rag paper
22.25” X 27”
Edition of 12
2014

Notes on ‘My Curves are not Crazy’

Elizabeth McIntosh, who lives in Vancouver, has shown across Canada and the United States including exhibitions at Blanket Contemporary Gallery and the Contemporary Art Gallery in Vancouver, and Parisian Laundry in Montreal. Group exhibitions include PAINT at the Vancouver Art Gallery, and Spell: A Travelling Exhibition of Contemporary Abstraction at the Mendel Art Gallery in Saskatoon. Her work is in public and private collections all over Canada. McIntosh is the recipient of a number of grants and awards. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Painting and Visual Arts at Emily Carr University.

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Sally Späth
“Black Walnut No. 28”
Archival pigment ink on paper
22” X 28”
Edition of 12
2015

Black Walnut is a large deciduous tree with and an oval to rounded crown. A mature tree will often have a long trunk with no lower branches. The bark is a dark gray-black with deep fissures; sharp ridges in the bark create diamond shapes. Black Walnut grows in valleys, along riverbanks, beside streams and on high land. The leaves are odd-pinnate with 13 to 23 oblong leaflets. The leaves turn an unremarkable yellow colour in fall. Yellow-green leaves appear in the spring. Male flowers are drooping hairy catkins. Female flowers ripen into an edible nut that is troublesome to open. The husks turn black as they rot on the ground. This print is from a large series of drawings that reflects on the experience of being close: close to the river, close to the tree, close to nature, close to the past.

For the past 10 years Sally Späth has made paintings directly on the wall using a combination of paper, tape and a highly reduced colour palette and paint stroke. Subtle in nature, her work explores a number of different boundaries between the paper and the wall and between positive and negative space. Späth has had solo exhibitions at the AGYU (2003), Wynick/Tuck Gallery (2006) and goodwater gallery (2007), and participated in a number of group exhibitions including "Working Title" (2008) at Diaz Contemporary. Späth lives and works in Toronto.

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Tiziana La Melia
"Dark Pines"
digital sublimation print on silk georgette
23” X 30”
Edition of 12
2015

Tiziana La Melia describes Dark Pines, a new digital print on silk georgette, as a diary. The images, which cite both productivity and decay, cluster together: compost, an archival image of silk worms, oranges left to rot, fragments of studio experiments with marbling. The scale of the print suggests a pillowcase of sorts – perhaps a site of transference for the thoughts and concerns that leaked from her mind as she tried to rest. The sprawling text, like the images, were composed during Venus retrograde and use a saccharine tone to acknowledge and offset the black bile bloom. 

Tiziana La Melia is an artist and writer based in Vancouver BC. She received her MFA at the University of Guelph (2011). She is currently participating in a residency at Parc Saint Leger in Pogues-les-Eaux. Upcoming and recent exhibitions include A Line in the Sand at Artist Curated Projects (LA), Stopping the Sun in its Course at Francois Ghebaly (LA), and The Eyelash and the Monochrome, Mercer Union (Toronto). A book of selected writing is forthcoming from Publication Studio (Vancouver). She is the 2014 recipient of the RBC painting prize.


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G would like to thank the following for their generous help and support:

The Artists
Susan Hobbs Gallery
Georgia Sherman Projects
Diaz Contemporary
Murray Guy
Allen Ash – Printmaking, SOFAM
Celine Atienza – Printmaking, SOFAM
goodwater
Imagefoundry (Dimitri Levanoff)
Superframe (Mitch Robertson)
Victoria Taylor and Katie Mathieu

Mailer: Shirley Wiitasalo